Job market candidates

  • Cacicedo Dos Santos, Thiago

  • Office: 0034P2071
  • Email: Thiago.cacicedo@uc3m.es
  • Extension: 3339
  • Website
  • Main fields

    Industrial Organisation and Applied Microeconomics

    Secondary fields

    Thesis supervisors

    Joel Sandonís
    Universidad de Alicante

    Pedro Albarrán
    Universidad de Alicante

     

    References

    Joel Sandonís
    Universidad de Alicante

    Pedro Albarrán
    Universidad de Alicante

    Pierre Dubois
    Toulouse School of Economics

  • Job market paper

  • Price discrimination in organic food markets: the case of ready-to-eat cereal

    Abstract: In this paper price discrimination with respect to the organic attribute on the ready-to-eat cereal industry is quantified. I estimate a random coefficient discrete choice demand model to obtain the price-elasticity of each product. Then, with the estimated elasticities and a supply
    model I recover the marginal costs, which allows to disentangle whether the amount of price difference between organic and non-organic products is due to price discrimination or due to different production costs. I find that around 6% of the price difference are due to price
    discrimination with respect to this attribute. A counterfactual exercise shows that a tax on non-organic products is welfare detrimental and do not substantially reduce price discrimination.

  • Serrano Quintero, Rafael

  • Office: 0034P2072
  • Email: rafael.serrano@ub.edu
  • Extension: 3349
  • Website
  • Main fields

    Macroeconomics, Economic Growth, Development and Structural Change

    Secondary fields

    Spatial Models of Economic Development

    Thesis supervisors

    Fidel Pérez Sebastián

    Universidad de Alicante

    References

    Fidel Pérez-Sebastian
    Universidad de Alicante

    Ákos Valentinyi
    University of Manchester

    Jevgenijs Steinbuks
    The World Bank

  • Job market paper

  • Structural Transformation in India: The Role of the Service Sector

    Abstract: The experience of industrialized countries shows that productivity growth in the manufacturing sector is consistently faster than in the service sector. India’s experience shows the opposite. Particularly, I show that the fastest growing industries in services grow faster than in
    manufacturing. To investigate why this has been the case and what it will convey for structural change and growth, I construct a five-sector model of structural change including agriculture, two manufacturing and two service sub-sectors. These two sub-sectors comprise the fastest and the slowest growing industries within each manufacturing and services. Furthermore, each sector can employ high and low-skill labor. The calibrated model suggests that the large supply of high-skill workers combined with higher skill intensity in the service sector seem to be
    behind the services take-off. The data imply that service sub-sectors are gross substitutes while manufacturing sub-sectors are gross complements. This will accelerate productivity growth in services and decelerate productivity growth in manufacturing.

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